April112014

The Valiant and the Damned - National Portrait Gallery - follow link for short biographies of each sitter.

(I saw this exhibition yesterday - I vaguely hoped they’d fish Sargent’s “Gassed” out of whichever storage box IWM has it in while they remodel, but they didn’t.)

April72014
(I think this is Capt Gillan, but I haven’t quite sorted out who’s who - but anyway he’s handsome and Scottish and has a typewriter and I’ve already used all the promo shots of the VADs and sisters, so he gets to headline this post).
So, the Crimson Field ep 1 aired last night! Who watched it? What did you think?
Me — beautifully shot, some clunky dialogue and a few cliches, Kitty Trevelyan (Oona Chaplin) is clearly heavily inspired by Vera Brittain—except with the attitude dialled up to 11. Also, Oona Chaplin is a perfect human being. I will keep watching.

(I think this is Capt Gillan, but I haven’t quite sorted out who’s who - but anyway he’s handsome and Scottish and has a typewriter and I’ve already used all the promo shots of the VADs and sisters, so he gets to headline this post).

So, the Crimson Field ep 1 aired last night! Who watched it? What did you think?

Me — beautifully shot, some clunky dialogue and a few cliches, Kitty Trevelyan (Oona Chaplin) is clearly heavily inspired by Vera Brittain—except with the attitude dialled up to 11. Also, Oona Chaplin is a perfect human being. I will keep watching.

April42014

“Sitting in a trench waiting for a rifle-grenade isn’t fighting; war is clambering out of the top trench at 3 o’clock in the morning with a lot of rum-drugged soldiers who don’t know where they’re going - half of them to be blasted with machine-guns at point-blank range - trying to get over the wire which our artillery have failed to destroy.”

—Siegfried Sassoon, in his diary, 4 April 1916.

12PM

“They came […] and told me that my little Tommy had been hit by a stray bullet and died last night. When last I saw him, two nights ago, he had his notebook in his hand, reading my last poem. And I said good night to him, in the moonlit trenches. Had I but known! - the old human-weak cry. Now he comes to me in memories, like an angel, with the light in his yellow hair, and I think of him at Cambridge last August when we lived together […] in rooms where the previous occupant’s name, Paradise, was written above the door.”

—Siegfried Sassoon diary entry on the death of his friend David Cuthbert Thomas, 19 March, 1916.

March262014

“Breathless, we flung us on the windy hill,
Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass.
You said, “Through glory and ecstasy we pass;
Wind, sun, and earth remain, the birds sing still,
When we are old, are old.…” “And when we die
All’s over that is ours; and life burns on
Through other lovers, other lips,” said I,
—“Heart of my heart, our heaven is now, is won!”

“We are Earth’s best, that learnt her lesson here.
Life is our cry. We have kept the faith!” we said;
“We shall go down with unreluctant tread
Rose-crowned into the darkness!”… Proud we were,
And laughed, that had such brave true things to say.
—And then you suddenly cried, and turned away.”

—The Hill - Rupert Brooke

March242014

Trailer: The Crimson Field - BBC1

(1st episode looks set to air w/o 5 - 11 April, but no firm release date as yet)

March232014
March222014

lord-kitschener:

On the Role of Women in World War One, or White Feathers and Bonbons : r/badhistory

Read More

March182014

“We had a young volunteer here called Bobbie Kernaghan. He said he was seventeen but looked about fifteen to me. He was just out and so keen to get at the Germans, they had killed his favourite uncle. I straightened his pack and checked his rifle (everything we have and wear is plastered with mud) before we went up and over on the 9th. We had hardly gone ten yards when he got it in the chest. He looked like a schoolboy asleep when they brought him in and laid him down.

He lay covered over in the bottom of the trench for a few days. Every time I passed him I thought of when I was seventeen and of the nine years I’ve had since then. You get very callous here after a while, you simply have to, but this lad’s death got through all my callousness.

The Divisional Commander inspected us this morning and congratulated us on our ‘great work at Ovillers’. Great!”

—Letter from Tom MacAlindon, Royal Irish Rifles (source)

March172014

“Dear child, there is no more to say; we have lost almost all there was to lose and what have we gained? Truly as you say has patriotism worn very very threadbare.”

—Edward to Vera, April 1917

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